IWH Update

New Issue Briefing released on adequacy of workers' compensation benefits in Ontario

How well does the current workers’ compensation system in Ontario make up for the lost earnings of injured workers with permanent impairments? Institute for Work & Health (IWH) Senior Scientist Dr. Emile Tompa recently updated an analysis of the adequacy of workers’ compensation benefits to include 1998 changes to Ontario’s workers’ compensation program. He followed the wage replacement rates of people with permanent impairments injured in 1998 to 2002 over a 10-year period. An Issue Briefing summarizing his updated findings is now available. Find it at: www.iwh.on.ca/issue-briefings.

IWH's 2016 Activity Plan now available

Every year, IWH compiles an activity plan detailing the research projects to be undertaken at the Institute that year. This year’s plan includes many activities that support the priorities identified in the Ontario Ministry of Labour’s prevention strategy. These include research to describe the circumstances of vulnerable workers, find effective interventions to mitigate the risks of hazardous work, develop leading indicators of workplace occupational health and safety performance, and support workplace practices in the prevention of work disability. To read about IWH research underway in 2016, go to: www.iwh.on.ca/activity-plan.

New case studies tell stories of impact of IWH research

One way for the Institute to track the impact of IWH research on the activities of stakeholders is through case studies. Among the latest case studies is the story of how safety messages in Ontario have undergone a shift in emphasis—from “young workers” to “new workers”—in response to IWH research findings. To read this and the other new case studies, go to: www.iwh.on.ca/impact.

Source: At Work, Issue 84, Spring 2016: Institute for Work & Health, Toronto