Upcoming Events

Other events associated with IWH may be listed under Plenaries, Workshops or the Alf Nachemson Memorial Lecture.

Friday, April 28, 2017

April 28 marks the National Day of Mourning to commemorate workers who have been killed or injured on the job, or who have fallen ill as a result of their work.

The Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety has podcasts of personal stories of workplace tragedy, images and messages you can share on social media, as well as posters, pins and stickers to help mark the day.

The Day of Mourning began more than 20 years ago when the Canadian Labour Congress declared April 28 as a day of remembrance for those who had died or been injured on the job. It was officially recognized by the federal government in 1991, and has spread to about 80 countries around the world.

Tuesday, May 2, 2017 to Wednesday, May 3, 2017

The Partners in Prevention 2017 Health & Safety Conference & Trade Show, taking place May 2-3 at the International Centre in Mississauga, Ontario, is Canada’s largest health and safety event. Hosted by Workplace Safety & Prevention Services (WSPS), it brings together 4,500-plus health and safety professionals for networking, education and knowledge sharing.

The Institute for Work & Health (IWH) will be at the trade show. Drop by our booth (#525) to learn more about our evidence-based tools and resources for preventing workplace injury and disability.

Partners in Prevention 2017 is also your chance to hear first-hand from three IWH scientists on their latest tools and findings.

IWH President and Senior Scientist Dr. Cameron Mustard will share findings from a study examining what Ontario employers spend to prevent work-related injury and illness. Many employers currently do not have an accurate estimate of the scale of this investment. The presentation will cover estimates of OHS expenditures on management and supervision, training, personal protective equipment and OHS professional services. The results may surprise you!

Senior Scientist Dr. Ben Amick will join WSPS’s Illia Tchernikov to present a session entitled, “Building a leading indicator program within your workplace to improve OHS performance." This presentation will address thinking about the right information at the right time for the right decisions. It will provide a step-by-step approach to building a leading indicator program within your organization.

Also, IWH Scientist Dr. Andrea Furlan will present a session on mitigating risks related to prescription opioid use in safety sensitive environments. In Canada, it is estimated that 23 people out of every 1,000 have a prescription for opioids, and those 23 people are at a significantly greater risk of having an accident while performing safety sensitive functions. This session will review the Canadian Guideline for Safe and Effective Use of Opioids, and discuss ways you can reduce your risk factors at the workplace.

For more information on the conference, go to: http://www.wsps.ca/pip/pip_home.html

Tuesday, May 2, 2017

Plenary by Dr. Maurits Van Tulder, VU University Amsterdam

The management of low-back pain has changed from a passive approach calling for bed rest, traction and massage to a more active approach, one focused on staying active, exercise and multidisclipnary rehabilitation. This is in line with the change from a biomedical to a biopsychosocial model for understanding low-back pain over the last 20 years. However, the burden of low-back pain is still high, and the evidence for the biopsychosocial approach is still small. In this plenary, Dr. Maurits Van Tulder discusses the need for a new revolution in low-back pain research and the obligation researchers have to contribute to improving clinical practice.

Wednesday, May 3, 2017 to Friday, May 5, 2017

Location:  Institute for Work & Health, Toronto, Ontario

Registration deadline: April 19, 2017

About the workshop

This workshops is designed to teach participants how to plan, conduct and communicate the results of a systematic review. Upon completion of a workshop, participants should have the knowledge and skills necessary to: plan and carry out a basic systematic review, understand the appropriate methods for more complex analysis, interpret the results of a meta-analysis, and accurately communicate the results and interpretation of a review.

Who should attend?

This workshop is intended for clinical trainees, clinicians, decision-makers, academics and researchers (epidemiologists, statisticians) with a general interest in the methodology of systematic reviews and for those planning to conduct a systematic review in the future.

Format

The three-day workshop combines a series of short lectures and exercises, led by Institute staff and invited lecturers from Canada and Europe. Extensive handout materials are provided.

Topics include

  • Evidence-based medicine, systematic reviews and Cochrane
  • Literature searches
  • Methodological quality of randomized controlled trials
  • Introduction to meta-analysis
  • Systematic reviews of observational studies
  • Software for conducting meta-analysis and systematic reviews
  • Critical appraisal of systematic reviews
  • Dissemination, implementation and guidelines

Fees

Registration fees are as follows:

Professional            $1,500
Student/trainee*    $   500

The fees cover all handouts, learning materials and a copy of RevMan software. Fees also cover the cost of lunches and coffee breaks. Participants are responsible for their own accommodation and transportation.

* Proof of enrolment in a graduate or post-graduate program or post-doctoral fellowship is required.

How to register

Because space is limited, registration is on a first-come, first-served basis.

To register, visit: www.iwh.on.ca/systematic-review-workshops/register

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

Plenary by John Oudyk, Andrew King and Alan Hall, The Labour/OHCOW/Academic Research Collaboration (LOARC)

The right of worker representation has been a central tenet of occupational health and safety for over 40 years. While evidence shows that it improves health and safety at work, few attempts have been made to show how. In this plenary, a team of academics and labour representatives known as LOARC (short for Labour/OHCOW/Academic Research Collaboration) share their work examining what worker representatives actually do to achieve change. How much does it matter whether worker representatives adopt a more legal/technical approach or a more knowledge activist approach? Findings on effective worker health and safety representation styles are discussed.

Thursday, May 25, 2017 to Friday, May 26, 2017

Keeping Workers Well is the premier conference for occupational health nurses in Canada. Hosted by the Ontario Occupational Health Nurses Association (OOHNA), the 2017 conference is taking place May 25 and 26 at the Four Points By Sheraton in Kingston, Ontario.

This year's conference theme is Putting Safety Back into OH&S. Speakers include occupational and public health professor Dr. Peter Strahlendorf on putting the emphasis on safety; brain training specialist Brian Thwaits on using brain plasticity to strengthen learning and memory and ensure safe practices; and medical director and psychotherapist Dr. Mark Weiss on addiction and neurobiology. Other session highlights include return to work challenges for workers with post-traumatic stress disorder and transgender inclusion in the workplace.

To find out more about the conference, and to register, go to: http://www.oohna.on.ca/oohna-conference/

Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Plenary by Dr. Alicia Kurowski, University of Massachusetts Lowell

Wednesday, November 29, 2017 to Friday, December 1, 2017

Location:  Institute for Work & Health, Toronto, Ontario

Registration deadline: November 15, 2017

About the workshop

This workshops is designed to teach participants how to plan, conduct and communicate the results of a systematic review. Upon completion of a workshop, participants should have the knowledge and skills necessary to: plan and carry out a basic systematic review, understand the appropriate methods for more complex analysis, interpret the results of a meta-analysis, and accurately communicate the results and interpretation of a review.

Who should attend?

This workshop is intended for clinical trainees, clinicians, decision-makers, academics and researchers (epidemiologists, statisticians) with a general interest in the methodology of systematic reviews and for those planning to conduct a systematic review in the future.

Format

The three-day workshop combines a series of short lectures and exercises, led by Institute staff and invited lecturers from Canada and Europe. Extensive handout materials are provided.

Topics include

  • Evidence-based medicine, systematic reviews and Cochrane
  • Literature searches
  • Methodological quality of randomized controlled trials
  • Introduction to meta-analysis
  • Systematic reviews of observational studies
  • Software for conducting meta-analysis and systematic reviews
  • Critical appraisal of systematic reviews
  • Dissemination, implementation and guidelines

Fees

Registration fees are as follows:

Professional            $1,500
Student/trainee*    $   500

The fees cover all handouts, learning materials and a copy of RevMan software. Fees also cover the cost of lunches and coffee breaks. Participants are responsible for their own accommodation and transportation.

* Proof of enrolment in a graduate or post-graduate program or post-doctoral fellowship is required.

How to register

Because space is limited, registration is on a first-come, first-served basis.

Online registration will open soon. E-mail Lyudmila Mansurova at srworkshops@iwh.on.ca if you wish to be added to the wait list.