Risk of work injury among adolescent students from single and partnered parent families

Publication type
Journal article
Authors
Wong IS Breslin FC
Date published
2017 Mar 01
Journal
American Journal of Industrial Medicine
Volume
60
Issue
3
Pages
285
Open Access?
No
Abstract

BACKGROUND: Parental involvement in keeping their children safe at work has been examined in a handful of studies, with mixed results. Evidence has suggested that non-work injury risk is higher among children from single-parent families, but little is known about their risk for work-related injuries. METHODS: Five survey cycles of the Canadian Community Health Survey were pooled to create a nationally representative sample of employed 15-19-year old students (N = 16,620). Multivariable logistic regression estimated the association between family status and work injury. RESULTS: Risk of work-related repetitive strains (OR:1.24, 95%CI: 0.69-2.22) did not differ by family type. However, children of single parents were less likely to sustain a work injury receiving immediate medical care (OR:0.43, 95%CI: 0.19-0.96). CONCLUSION: Despite advantages and disadvantages related to family types, there is no evidence that work-related injury risk among adolescents from single parent families is greater than that of partnered-parent families. Am. J. Ind. Med. 60:285-294, 2017. (c) 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc