At Work

Current issue: At Work 93 (Summer 2018)

Working long hours increases the risk of diabetes among women, but not men—one of several findings in the issue on sex and gender differences in work and health.

Supervisors’ first reactions to injury can affect the likelihood of injured workers successfully returning to work.

Hiring and accommodating people with serious mental illnesses is a net benefit for employers, according to economic evaluations in five workplaces.

At Work is the flagship newsletter of the Institute for Work & Health. Published quarterly and available as a pdf or online, the newsletter includes engaging and lay-friendly articles reporting on the Institute's latest research findings in the areas of work injury, illness and disability prevention. The newsletter also shares stories of how these findings are applied in practice, as well as the impact they are having on improving outcomes for workers, employers and policy-makers.

Latest articles

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Men and women face similar risks of physical violence at work, but the risks of sexual violence at work are four times higher for women than for men
Published: August 6, 2018
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Study of workers with arthritis finds the need for workplace supports goes unmet more often among women, and that's due to the type of jobs and workplaces women are in
Published: August 6, 2018
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IWH study examines differences between men and women when it comes to the links between stress and psychosocial work factors such as supervisor support, job control and job security
Published: August 6, 2018
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When a worker gets injured, does the supervisor react with blame and skepticism or with empathy and support? The reaction can make a difference to the worker's return-to-work outcomes.
Published: August 3, 2018
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Working too long increases risks of diabetes—for women, not men—IWH and ICES study finds
Published: August 3, 2018