Are non-invasive interventions effective for the management of headaches associated with neck pain? An update of the Bone and Joint Decade Task Force on Neck Pain and Its Associated Disorders by the Ontario Protocol for Traffic Injury Management (OPTIMa)

TitleAre non-invasive interventions effective for the management of headaches associated with neck pain? An update of the Bone and Joint Decade Task Force on Neck Pain and Its Associated Disorders by the Ontario Protocol for Traffic Injury Management (OPTIMa)
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsVaratharajan, S, Ferguson, B, Chrobak, K, Shergill, Y, Cote, P, Wong, JJ, Yu, H, Shearer, HM, Southerst, D, Sutton, D, Randhawa, K, Jacobs, C, Abdulla, S, Woitzik, E, Marchand, AA, van der Velde, G, Carroll, LJ, Nordin, M, Ammendolia, C, Mior, S, Ameis, A, Stupar, M, Taylor-Vaisey, A
JournalEuropean Spine JournalEur Spine J
Volume25
Issue7
Pagination1971 - 1999
Date Published2016/07//
RefMan ID (Library)47442
Abstract

PURPOSE: To update findings of the 2000-2010 Bone and Joint Decade Task Force on Neck Pain and its Associated Disorders and evaluate the effectiveness of non-invasive and non-pharmacological interventions for the management of patients with headaches associated with neck pain (i.e., tension-type, cervicogenic, or whiplash-related headaches). METHODS: We searched five databases from 1990 to 2015 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs), cohort studies, and case-control studies comparing non-invasive interventions with other interventions, placebo/sham, or no interventions. Random pairs of independent reviewers critically appraised eligible studies using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network criteria to determine scientific admissibility. Studies with a low risk of bias were synthesized following best evidence synthesis principles. RESULTS: We screened 17,236 citations, 15 studies were relevant, and 10 had a low risk of bias. The evidence suggests that episodic tension-type headaches should be managed with low load endurance craniocervical and cervicoscapular exercises. Patients with chronic tension-type headaches may also benefit from low load endurance craniocervical and cervicoscapular exercises; relaxation training with stress coping therapy; or multimodal care that includes spinal mobilization, craniocervical exercises, and postural correction. For cervicogenic headaches, low load endurance craniocervical and cervicoscapular exercises; or manual therapy (manipulation with or without mobilization) to the cervical and thoracic spine may also be helpful. CONCLUSIONS: The management of headaches associated with neck pain should include exercise. Patients who suffer from chronic tension-type headaches may also benefit from relaxation training with stress coping therapy or multimodal care. Patients with cervicogenic headache may also benefit from a course of manual therapy

DOI10.1007/s00586-016-4376-9
Reprint EditionIN FILE
Citation Key47442