Cannabis and work

With the legalization of recreational marijuana in Canada on the horizon, workplaces are concerned about its implications for workplace health, safety and productivity. IWH researchers are watching the research literature and conducting their own studies in order to help answer questions about marijuana use at work: its scope, its effects, and its relationship to work-related injuries and deaths.

Featured

A close-up of a man's hand, holding a joint
At Work article

At-work use of cannabis reported by 1 in 12 workers—no change since legalization

In follow-up study of cannabis use before and after legalization in Canada, IWH research team found a rise in casual use, but no increase in at-work or daily use
Published: April 15, 2020
A close-up of a man's hand, holding a joint
At Work article

At-work use of cannabis reported by 1 in 12 workers—no change since legalization

In follow-up study of cannabis use before and after legalization in Canada, IWH research team found no increase in at-work or daily use of cannabis. Still, one in 12 said they used cannabis just before work, during work or during work breaks.
Published: April 2020
Daily Commercial News logo
IWH in the media

Where does the use of cannabis now stand in the eyes of the workplace?

Has cannabis use and perception about workplace cannabis use changed since legalization? That’s the question Dr. Nancy Carnide and a team at the Institute for Work and Health (IWH) is exploring through annual surveys of Canadian workers. Angela Gismondi reports on the preliminary results, which Carnide shared at the Ontario General Contractors Association (OGCA) and Infrastructure Health and Safety Association (IHSA) Leadership Day.
Published: Daily Commercial News, March 2020
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IWH in the media

Addressing mental health, substance abuse at work requires new approaches: Experts

A panel of professionals offered tips for dealing with mental illness and substance use disorder in the workplace at the recent OGCA Leadership Conference. On the panel, Dr. Nancy Carnide, a scientist with the Institute for Work & Health who is conducting a survey on cannabis in the workplace, said that employers need to look at how the workplace may be contributing to substance use.
Published: Daily Commercial News, March 2020
IWH Speaker Series
IWH Speaker Series

Have cannabis use and perceptions about workplace use changed since legalization?

Are workers using and thinking differently about cannabis at work now that the non-medical use of cannabis is legal? A team at the Institute for Work & Health led by Associate Scientist Dr. Nancy Carnide is answering this question through annual surveys of Canadian workers, asking about their use and understanding of, as well as their perceptions about, cannabis at work. In this presentation, Dr. Carnide shares early results from her comparison of workers’ pre- and post-legalization responses to questions about cannabis at work.
Published: March 2020
Daily Commercial News logo
IWH in the media

IWH takes deep dive into the marijuana Pandora’s box

A team at the Toronto-based Institute of Work and Health (IWH) is doing a deep dive into the issue, though, that might yield valuable data for the industry. Findings from the work will help identify gaps in knowledge, problematic perceptions and risky use patterns, Grant Cameron reports.
Published: Daily Commercial News, January 2020
Infographic
Infographic

Cannabis use and the Canadian workplace (pre-legalization)

From 2018 to 2021, the Institute for Work & Health is conducting a yearly survey of Canadian workers about cannabis to understand how the legalization of non-medical cannabis in October 2018 is affecting workers’ cannabis use, and affecting the beliefs of both users and non-users about cannabis use at work. The first survey was conducted in June 2018, before the legalization of non-medical cannabis four months later. This infographic shares some of what was learned.
Published: October 2019
IWH Speaker Series
IWH Speaker Series

The link between workplace injury and fatality risks and the use of substances affecting the central nervous system

Prescription and recreational drugs that act on the central nervous system can have many adverse effects, including cognitive and psychomotor impairment. An IWH systematic review has looked into the link between workplace injury and fatality risks and the use of such substances—including opioids, benzodiazepines and cannabis. In this presentation, Dr. Nancy Carnide shares findings from that systematic review.
Published: May 2019
Project
Project

Cannabis and workplace fatalities: establishing a baseline in Ontario

Can we use coroner data to establish incidences when cannabis is involved in a workplace fatality? This study aims to find out.
Status: Ongoing
Project
Project

Workplace cannabis use and perceptions among Canadian workers

An IWH research team is following up pre-legalization survey of workers about their use and perceptions of marijuana at work with a post-legalization survey that will determine if use patterns and perceptions have changed.
Status: Ongoing
CPA logo
IWH in the media

Canadians need to be educated on cannabis in the workplace, new study says

Research is limited on the impact marijuana use has on productivity and safety at work. Now, organizations need to revisit their employment policies. Sophie Nicholls Jones reports, with findings from IWH's study of at-work cannabis use and attitudes.
Published: CPA Canada, November 2018