IWH in the media

Listed below are selected articles published by organizations external to the Institute for Work & Health (IWH) that mention the Institute’s work. This includes articles that report on IWH research and/or quote Institute researchers, as well as articles written by IWH researchers or staff. The organizations include general media, specialty media in the field of work injury and disability prevention, and prevention system partners. The list runs from the most recent to the oldest media mention. It is not exhaustive.

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Temp agency proposal leaves workers vulnerable, legal clinics say

A new policy on temp agencies under consideration at the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board is “inadequate” and fails to “address and rectify the very real dangers temporary employment agencies pose to workers,” says a coalition of Toronto-based legal clinics. Sara Mojtehedzadeh reports in a story citing Institute for Work & Health research on temporary agency workers.
Media outlet
The Toronto Star
Date published
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Can data help prevent workplace injuries and death?

Can big data—and its less complex sibling, routine data—help prevent injuries and death? Yes, say Institute for Work & Health's Dr. Chris McLeod and Dr. Cameron Mustard. Routine data has been put to productive use in Ontario, where the Ministry of Labour learned that falls from heights (more than three metres) were the biggest cause of traumatic death in the construction industry, says Mustard, in an article by Peter Caulfield.
Media outlet
Journal of Commerce
Published by: ConstructConnect / Burnaby, BC
Date published
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New immigrants vulnerable to workplace accidents

New arrivals in Canada face additional vulnerabilities on the job, according to studies by Institute for Work and Health (IWH) in Toronto, writes Ian Harvey.
Media outlet
Daily Commercial News
Published by: ConstructConnect / Markham, ON
Date published
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Marijuana in the workplace: What is unsafe?

The federal government’s commitment to legalize recreational marijuana by July 1, 2018 raises occupational health and safety concerns for many employers. At the Institute for Work & Health (IWH), we have been reviewing the effects of various drugs that act on the central nervous system — including marijuana — on workplace injuries, deaths and near-misses, write IWH's Dr. Andrea Furlan and Dr. Nancy Carnide. What is striking is how little high-quality evidence there is on the impacts of marijuana in the workplace and how inconsistent the existing data is.
Media outlet
The Conversation
Published by: The Conversation / Toronto, ON
Date published
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Companies fret about hazy rules around pot use

Once recreational cannabis use becomes legal, taking a “smoke break” at work could suddenly become much more complicated, writes Cassandra Szklarski of the Canadian Press. The Institute for Work & Health's Dr. Andrea Furlan and Dr. Nancy Carnide are among those interviewed.
Media outlet
National Post
Published by: Postmedia Network / Toronto, ON
Date published
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Ontario plans to review Working at Heights training

“Working at heights is one of the most dangerous types of work in the construction sector,” says Dr. Cameron Mustard, president and senior scientist, Institute for Work & Health, in an article on Ontario's plans to review working-at-heights training standards. “By working with stakeholders to evaluate the WAH standards, we will help ensure construction workers are protected on the job and will return home safely at the end of each workday.”
Media outlet
Equipment Journal
Published by: Pace Publishing / Mississauga, ON
Date published
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Expert shares tools to improve site safety culture, climate

Dr. Linda Goldenhar, an expert in the safety culture and climate of construction workplaces, was in Toronto recently to discuss the research that led her team to develop a workbook to help strengthen jobsite safety and an online tool that assesses a workplace’s safety climate maturity, reports Angela Gismondi on IWH's Nachemson lecture.
Media outlet
Daily Commercial News
Date published
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The role of benefits plans in responding to the opioid crisis

What steps can benefit plan sponsors take to help reduce the opioid crisis? The Institute for Work & Health's Dr. Andrea Furlan is among those interviewed.
Media outlet
Benefits Canada
Published by: Transcontinental Media / Toronto, ON
Date published
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Workers with disabilities report greater OHS vulnerability

According to a new study by the Institute for Work and Health (IWH), workers who identify as having a disability are more likely to be exposed to workplace hazards. Additionally, they are more likely to face inadequate occupational health and safety (OHS) protections. “Basically, they get hit with a double whammy,” said Dr. Curtis Breslin, lead author of the study.
Media outlet
Canadian Occupational Safety
Published by: Thomson Reuters / Toronto, ON
Date published
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Recent immigrants, refugees largely unaware of OHS: Researchers

When immigrants and refugees come to Canada, they are handed a 140-page document that contains only one small paragraph about employee rights. Unfortunately, this might be the only OHS exposure these workers receive, writes Amanda Silliker, reporting on an Institute for Work & Health research project.
Media outlet
Canadian Occupational Safety
Published by: Thomson Reuters / Toronto, ON
Date published
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'We're not seeing the truth': Inside the hidden dangers of the Canadian workplace

Unlike Australia, Britain and the United States, Canada does not have a national database of on-the-job fatality rates, Tavia Grant writes. Without such information, which can yield valuable preventive measures, is enough being done to protect the workers who needlessly risk their lives, or the families that grieve their avoidable loss?
Media outlet
The Globe and Mail
Date published
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Canada’s deadliest jobs

It seems a basic question: What is the most deadly type of work in Canada? The answer isn’t readily available. While data are produced on the annual number of death claims by occupation, Canada – unlike other developed countries – doesn’t produce worker fatality rates. Tavia Grant shares the methods used by the Globe to come up with a fatality rate, with help from the Institute's Dr. Cameron Mustard
Media outlet
The Globe and Mail
Date published
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No, a standing desk isn't as unhealthy as smoking

A headline today has proclaimed that standing at work is “as unhealthy as a cigarette a day," citing a new study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology. Illustrated with a picture of a woman bent over her standing desk clutching at her back, we’re instructed to “sit back down." But a closer look at the research in question reveals very little to do with standing desks. In fact, the study did not look at standing desks at all, writes Suzi Gage.
Media outlet
The Guardian
Published by: Guardian News and Media / London
Date published
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Bad news: Now standing at work is killing you, too

Wait, what? It's been less than a week since we shared with you the grim news that sitting as much as you do will one day transform you into a helpless, miserable, immobile old person who can barely walk. Now, a team of Canadian researchers have found that people who primarily stand at work are twice as likely to develop heart disease as their chair-dwelling counterparts
Media outlet
GQ
Published by: Conde Nast / New York, NY
Date published
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If you stand for too long at work, you could double your risk of this disease

Odds are, you already know about the scary things that sitting can do to your health. But we have some bad news: Your standing desk may be doing more harm than good, too, writes Brooke Nelson.
Media outlet
Reader's Digest
Date published
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Standing too much at work can double your risk of heart disease

People who primarily stand on the job are twice as likely to develop heart disease as people who primarily sit. This was the case even after taking into account a wide range of factors, including personal factors, health and the type of work being performed, writes Dr. Peter Smith in The Conversation.
Media outlet
The Conversation
Date published
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Undercover in temp nation

Amina Diaby died last year in an accident inside one of the GTA’s largest industrial bakeries where, the company says, worker safety is its highest concern. The 23-year-old was one of thousands of Ontarians who have turned to temporary employment agencies to find jobs that often come with low pay and little training for sometimes dangerous work. The Star’s Sara Mojtehedzadeh went undercover for a month at the factory where Diaby worked
Media outlet
The Toronto Star
Date published
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Standing all day is twice as bad as sitting for your heart

On the circle of health hype, what was bad becomes good, then it becomes overrated, then it becomes bad again. That’s what happened to barefoot running and multivitamins, and it’s where the purported dangers of “too much sitting” seem to be headed. But the truth is probably somewhere in the middle rather than on the peaks or in the valleys. With that in mind, it’s worth looking at an interesting study just published in the American Journal of Epidemiology that finds jobs that require a lot of standing to be much worse for your health than jobs that require mostly sitting, writes Alex Hutchinson.
Media outlet
Runner's World
Published by: Hearst Communications / Emmaus, PA
Date published
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Injury and wellness: what are employers spending on prevention?

What workplace injuries and illnesses cost in Ontario is evident, but what do Ontario employers spend on prevention? That’s a question the Institute for Work and Health (IWH) is attempting to answer with a pilot study that’s underway. Dr. Cameron Mustard shared some of the early results.
Media outlet
Plant
Published by: Annex Business Media / Toronto, ON
Date published
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Too much standing is bad, study finds — it's time to move

People who stand for long periods at work may have another reason to join their seated colleagues in moving more. "There's a good body of research evidence that shows standing a lot is actually bad for your health," said Peter Smith, a senior scientist at the Institute for Work & Health.
Media outlet
CBC
Published by: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation / Toronto, ON
Date published
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Weed at work

The legalization of recreational marijuana in Canada came closer to reality on April 13, when the Justin Trudeau government introduced the Cannabis Act, or Bill C-45. While pot users across the country applaud the move, others have raised concerns about the effect that the proposed legislation would have on workplace safety, writes Jeff Cottrill in an article that quotes the Institute for Work & Health's Dr. Andrea Furlan.
Media outlet
OHS Canada
Published by: Annex Business Media / Toronto, ON
Date published
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Construction among highest spending sectors to prevent work-related injuries

The construction sector is in the top five of 17 sectors in terms of spending per worker per year on preventing work-related injury and illness, says the president and senior scientist at the Institute for Work and Health (IWH) who is conducting a pilot study on the matter
Media outlet
Daily Commercial News
Published by: Construction Market Data Group / Markham, ON
Date published
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New study shows that life and career stage do matter when thinking about the impact of arthritis on employment

Arthritis affects 4.3 million Canadians, 60 per cent of whom are under the age of 65. Yet, we know little about how people with arthritis balance their work responsibilities with the management of their health condition at different stages of their lives, writes Institute for Work & Health (IWH) Research Associate Julie Bowring.
Media outlet
CAPA Newsletter
Published by: Canadian Arthritis Patient Alliance / Toronto, ON
Date published
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Developing standards for managing workplace disability

According to 2012 figures, about one in 10 Canadians of working age live with some form of disability—whether physical or mental, chronic or acute, episodic or temporary, work-related or otherwise. That's why the CRWDP is working with partners to develop a new system standard for managing work disability prevention.
Media outlet
Rehab & Community Care Medicine
Published by: BCS Communications Ltd. / Toronto, ON
Date published
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Work injuries have dipped: IWH report

A study conducted by the Institute for Work & Health (IWH) shows work-related injuries in Ontario declined by 30 per cent from 2004 to 2011, reaffirming the efforts made by employers to make the workplace safe, states Patrick McManus, chair of the Ontario Construction Employers Coalition (CEC).
Media outlet
Daily Commercial News
Published by: Construction Market Data Group / Markham, ON
Date published
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Making the best of RTW interventions

Multi-faceted programs that package together different components have their advantages, writes Institute for Work & Health (IWH)'s Uyen Vu.
Media outlet
Canadian HR Reporter
Published by: Thomson Reuters / Toronto, ON
Date published
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Work injury rates on the decline in Ontario: IWH

Work-related injury rates in Ontario fell by 30 per cent from 2004 to 2011 — in sharp contrast to non-work injury rates, which did not change — according to a study by Institute for Work & Health (IWH) Senior Scientist and President Dr. Cameron Mustard.
Media outlet
Canadian Safety Reporter
Published by: Thomson Reuters Canada / Toronto, ON
Date published
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Getting back on one's feet

Healthcare providers who treat injured workers with multiple injuries and complex illnesses find the workers’ compensation system and return-to-work (RTW) process “opaque and confusing.” That's one of the findings from a two-year, multijurisdictional study by the Institute of Work & Health (IWH).
Media outlet
OHS Canada
Published by: Annex Newcom / Toronto, ON
Date published
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Epidemic of untreatable back an neck pain costs billions, study finds

Costing the US alone $88bn a year, low back and neck pain is widespread and expensive. Dr. Andrea Furlan of the Institute for Work & Health (IWH) and Cochrane Back and Neck discusses treatment options that are recommended, as well as some that aren't.
Media outlet
The Guardian
Published by: Guardian News and Media / London
Date published
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Increased OHS vulnerability linked to higher rates of self-reported injury: study

Workers who report being vulnerable because they are exposed to job hazards from which they are not adequately protected by workplace policies, awareness programs or empowerment mechanisms also report much higher rates of work-related injury.
Media outlet
Canadian Occupational Safety
Published by: Thomson Reuters / Toronto, ON
Date published
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Doctors frustrated workers’ compensation boards seem to ignore medical opinions, report says

The Toronto Star interviews Dr. Agnieszka Kosny about the findings of her study on the role of health-care providers in workers' compensation and return-to-work.
Media outlet
The Toronto Star
Published by: Torstar Publishing / Toronto, ON
Date published
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Young adults with arthritis more likely to be workers, not students

A survey of young adults by the Institute for Work & Health (IWH) revealed that those with arthritis reported significantly higher rates of employment and lower rates of education participation than their peers without arthritis.
Media outlet
AJMC.com
Published by: American Journal of Managed Care / Cranbury, NJ
Date published
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Bill introduced to end asbestos use in the province

Sarnia-Lambton MPP Bob Bailey is calling on Ontario to ban asbestos, a substance that has had a deadly impact in his community. “In my riding of Sarnia-Lambton, there are many, many families who have buried loved one because of the mesothelioma they developed from exposure to asbestos while at work,” Bailey said. Paul Morden reports in an article that cites Institute for Work & Health research on the burden of asbestos.
Media outlet
Sarnia Observer
Published by: Sun Media / Sarnia, ON
Date published
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The vulnerable worker

A new questionnaire has been developed by the Institute for Work & Health (IWH) to measure the extent to which workers are at increased risk of work-related injury and illness.
Media outlet
OOHNA Journal
Published by: Ontario Occupational Health Nurses Association / Toronto, ON
Date published
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Penalties work: Citations and fines can reduce work injuries

Deterrence campaigns or penalties: What’s more effective? The Canadian Safety Reporter reports on an Institute for Work & Health (IWH) systematic review on the effectiveness of regulatory OHS enforcement.
Media outlet
Canadian Safety Reporter
Published by: Thomson Reuters Canada / Toronto, ON
Date published
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7 principles for return to work

After workers have suffered an injury or illness, employers have a duty to help them return to work. But successful RTW can be hard to achieve. As a result of a systematic review, the Institute for Work & Health (IWH) identified several elements contributing to a successful RTW. Here’s a look at the seven principles the IWH researchers developed based on those elements.
Media outlet
OHS Insider
Published by: Bongarde Media / Penticton, BC
Date published
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Returning to work after a mental health work injury

Much of what we know about the factors linked with successful return to work is based on musculoskeletal injury claims. When it comes to reintegrating workers after a psychological injury, however, practitioners still face considerable challenges, according to an article by Institute for Work & Health (IWH)'s Uyen Vu and Dr. Peter Smith.
Media outlet
OOHNA Journal
Published by: Ontario Occupational Health Nurses Association / Toronto, ON
Date published
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Making the business case for safety: Case study shows benefits of participatory ergonomics continue for years

Implementing a participatory ergonomics program takes time and money. To get your company’s senior management on board with such a program, show them this case study from the Institute for Work & Health (IWH), which shows how an Ontario utility continued to benefit years after implementing a participatory ergonomics program.
Media outlet
OHS Insider
Published by: Bongarde Media / Penticton, BC
Date published
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Forceful motion key risk factor for carpal tunnel syndrome

Workers who often use their hands in a forceful gripping and pinching motion face a higher risk of developing carpal tunnel syndrome, a painful condition that causes tingling, numbness and weakness in the hand and sometimes requires surgery, according to recent research.
Media outlet
Canadian Occupational Safety
Published by: Thomson Reuters Canada / Toronto, ON
Date published
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Making the business case for safety: Don't sacrifice safety for operations

Does paying attention to workplace health and safety take away from operational effectiveness? A team that included Institute for Work & Health researchers addresses this debate in a recent study.
Media outlet
OHS Insider
Published by: Bongarde Media / Penticton, BC
Date published
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Sex, gender differences may cause higher risk of some MSK injuries among women: research

Women who do the same tasks as men often face a higher risk of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) in their neck and upper limbs, according to McGill University's Dr. Julie Côté, keynote speaker at the 9th International Scientific Conference on the Prevention of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders (PREMUS 2016).
Media outlet
Massage Therapy Canada
Published by: Annex-Business Media / Simcoe, ON
Date published
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Government inspections and fines lead to safer workplaces, researchers claim

Government safety and health inspections that result in penalties for non-compliant employers encourage organizations to take action to reduce work-related injuries, according to research from the Institute for Work & Health.
Media outlet
Safety + Health
Published by: U.S. National Safety Council / Itasca, IL
Date published
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New tool measures workplace safety systems and culture

How safe do you really feel in your workplace? What’s your day-to-day experience when it comes to health and safety? Enter the CAAT – or Climate Audit and Assessment Tool – a new way to measure workplace health and safety systems and culture. This article on the tool mentions the Institute for Work & Health's involvement in the project.
Media outlet
Workplace Safety North
Date published
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OHS inspections with penalties effectively reduce work injuries: IWH

Government health and safety inspections that result in citations or penalties effectively motivate employers to make improvements that reduce work-related injuries, according to the Institute for Work & Health (IWH) in Toronto.
Media outlet
Canadian Occupational Safety
Published by: Thomson Reuters Canada / Toronto, ON
Date published
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Vulnerable workers: Practical steps to protect new and young workers

This Insider Special Report will help you to protect these vulnerable workers by explaining how “newness” can impact workers’ health and safety; the legal protections for new and young workers under the OHS and related laws; and some practical steps you can take to protect this segment of your workforce.
Media outlet
OHS Insider
Published by: Bongarde Media / Penticton, BC
Date published
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Should you try massage for back pain?

How does a rubdown compare with physical therapy and acupuncture for treating back pain? Institute for Work & Health's Dr. Andrea Furlan comments on the research evidence.
Media outlet
Consumer Reports
Published by: Consumer Reports / Yonkers, NY
Date published
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Asbestos-related cancers cost Canada $2B

Canada spends about $1.7 billion annually on asbestos-related cancers stemming from occupational exposure, according to a recent Institute for Work & Health study.
Media outlet
Asbestos.com
Published by: The Mesothelioma Center / Washington, DC
Date published
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Sit-stand combo helps prevent work-related health issues: expert

To reduce the health and injury risks of prolonged sitting, workers should change postures often and aim to stand for an equal amount of time that they spend sitting over the course of a work day. That was Dr. Jack Callaghan's message in a keynote address at the recent 9th International Scientific Conference on the Prevention of Work-Related Musculoskeletal Disorders (PREMUS 2016).
Media outlet
Canadian Chiropractor
Published by: Annex Business Media / Simcoe, ON
Date published
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Asbestos-related cancer costs Canada billions

A first-ever estimate of the toll of asbestos-related cancers on society pegs the cost of new cases at $1.7-billion per year in Canada, and notes that is likely an under-estimate.
Media outlet
The Globe and Mail
Date published
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Early Intervention: Evidence-based predictors of return-to-work in LBP patients

Low-back pain is a leading cause of work absenteeism in Canada and other industrialized countries. Most workers with acute low-back pain (those experiencing pain for up to six weeks) return to work following a relatively straightforward path. Unfortunately, some do not. It’s important for chiropractors to understand the factors that affect the length of time it takes before low-back pain patients return to work, writes the Institute for Work & Health (IWH)'s Uyen Vu.
Media outlet
Canadian Chiropractor
Published by: Annex Business Media / Simcoe, ON
Date published
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New worker, higher risk

Experts say orientation, training are crucial to keeping new workers safe. The Institute for Work & Health (IWH)'s Dr Peter Smith and Dr. Curtis Breslin offer comments on their studies about injury risks among new and young workers.
Media outlet
Safety + Health
Published by: U.S. National Safety Council / Itasca, IL
Date published
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Age and length of disability for eight chronic conditions

Does an aging American workforce mean more time lost due to chronic conditions such as arthritis, cancer, chronic pulmonary disease, coronary artery disease, diabetes, depression, hypertension, and low back pain?
Media outlet
LexisNexis Legal Newsroom/Workers' Compensation Law
Published by: LexisNexis / Irvine, Calif.
Date published
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Managing your OHS program: A case study on breakthrough changes in safety

Past research has identified the characteristics of firms that perform poorly or well with respect to work-related injury and illness prevention, but it hasn’t shown what it takes to go from one category to the other. A study by researchers at the Institute for Work & Health aimed to help fill that gap.
Media outlet
OHS Insider
Published by: Bongarde Media / Penticton, BC
Date published
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Study looks at relationship between employers and doctors in return to work

A key element of a successful return to work is a good, communicative relationship among the injured worker, the employer and the worker’s doctors. But a study found the relationship between employers and doctors can be marred by mistrust and lack of communication.
Media outlet
OHS Insider
Published by: Bongarde Media / Penticton, BC
Date published
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New IWH study looks at why companies make big improvements

Why do companies make changes in their OHS programs, safety rules, safety culture, etc., especially big improvements? And what motivates companies that were low performers in health and safety to take steps to become good performers?
Media outlet
OHS Insider
Published by: Bongarde Media / Penticton, BC
Date published
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External influences motivate firms to improve OHS performance

When workplaces make large improvements in occupational health and safety, it seems some type of external influence helps bring internal factors into play, according to a study by the Institute for Work & Health in Toronto.
Media outlet
Canadian Occupational Safety Newswire
Published by: Thomson Reuters Canada / Toronto, ON
Date published
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External factors influence improvements in workplace safety performance: IWH study

When workplaces make large improvements in occupational health and safety (OHS), it seems some type of external influence helps bring three internal factors into play: an organizational motivation to take action in OHS, the introduction of new OHS knowledge, and an engaged health and safety champion who integrates that knowledge into the organization.
Media outlet
Canadian Chiropractor
Published by: Annex Business Media / Simcoe, ON
Date published
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No small measure

The Institute for Work & Health’s DASH (Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand) Outcome Measure continues to be adopted and used around the world as it turns 20 years’ old, according to an article written by Institute for Work & Health (IWH)'s Carol Kennedy and Uyen Vu.
Media outlet
OOHNA Journal
Published by: Ontario Occupational Health Nurses Association / Toronto, ON
Date published
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Injured workers more likely to stay depressed if symptoms don't improve after 6 months: study

Poor mental health six months after an injury in the workplace indicates it will persist at the 12-month mark, finds a study by the Institute for Work and Health (IWH).
Media outlet
Canadian Safety Reporter
Published by: Thomson Reuters Canada / Toronto, ON
Date published
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In bid to tackle workplace abuse, a model that works

Advocates say better inspections and bigger fines could help curb wage theft. The Institute for Work & Health (IWH)'s Dr. Cameron Mustard comments on the need to communicate to medium- and large-scale employers of the consequences of making mistakes.
Media outlet
The Toronto Star
Date published
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Injuries at work may increase risk of losing one's job

The Institute for Work & Health (IWH)'s Peter Smith comments on a new U.S. study of nursing home workers, which finds workers are more likely to lose their jobs within six months of an injury.
Media outlet
Reuters Health
Date published
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Working with arthritis

Employees with arthritis may have limitations, but accommodations can help, according to an article that cites a study by Institute for Work & Health (IWH)'s Dr. Monique Gignac.
Media outlet
Safety + Health
Published by: U.S. National Safety Council / Itasca, IL
Date published
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Unionized construction workers in Ontario less likely to be injured, less lost time than non-construction workers, says new study

Sean Strickland, of the Ontario Construction Secretariat, which funded the Institute for Work & Health (IWH) study, says it confirms there is a ‘union safety effect’ on workplaces.
Media outlet
The Hill Times
Date published
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Study finds shift workers have harder time recovering from injury

It’s well documented that employees who work evening, night or rotating shifts face a higher risk of being injured on the job than those who work days. But a new study by Dr. Imelda Wong from the Institute for Work & Health has found that shift workers are also more likely to have a harder time recovering from such an injury.
Media outlet
OHS Insider
Published by: Bongarde Communications / Penticton, BC
Date published
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Are union workers safer?

An Institute for Work & Health (IWH) study states construction firms that employ union workers have fewer work injuries that require workers’ compensation payments for time away from work.
Media outlet
Roofing
Published by: The Industry's Voice / Durham, NC
Date published
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OHSA likely to raise fines in 2016

Research conducted by the Institute for Work & Health (IWH) has convinced the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) that more expensive fines for workplace-safety violations are likely to send stronger messages to employers to improve workplace-safety efforts.
Media outlet
Electrical Contractor Magazine
Published by: National Electrical Contractors Association / Bethesda, MD
Date published
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Feelings of depression after a physical work injury

The six-month period after injury a potential is a “window of opportunity” to identify and address mental health problems, writes Institute for Work & Health (IWH) study author Nancy Carnide.
Media outlet
Visions
Published by: B.C. Partners for Mental Health and Addictions Information / Vancouver, BC
Date published
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On-the-job resistance training helps prevent musculoskeletal disorder: Review

Implementing workplace-based resistance training can help prevent musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) of the upper extremity, according to a review by the Institute for Work and Health (IWH).
Media outlet
Canadian Safety Reporter
Published by: Thomson Reuters Canada / Toronto, ON
Date published
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Workplace resistance training program helps reduce musculoskeletal disorders: study

Strong evidence suggests that implementing workplace-based resistance training can help prevent and manage musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) of the upper extremity. That's one of the key findings coming out of a systematic review conducted by IWH and published in the Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
Media outlet
Canada Chiropractor
Published by: Annex Business Media / Simcoe, ON
Date published
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Researchers conclude that OSHA citations, penalties reduce workplace injuries

A new study from the Institute for Work and Health (IWH) confirms the importance of OSHA inspections and penalties, says Dr. David Michaels, assistant secretary at the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration.
Media outlet
OSHA QuickTakes
Published by: Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) / Washington, DC
Date published
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Hand in hand

The debate on the role of unions in influencing workplace safety is as old as unions are. Organized labour, by serving as employee advocates, may have a positive influence on job safety after all, according to a recent Institute for Work & Health (IWH) study.
Media outlet
OHS Canada
Published by: Annex Newcom / Toronto, ON
Date published
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Exercise to ease MSD pain

You’ve been proactive, taking steps to manage job stress, and making ergonomic adjustments and enhancements to your work area to protect against musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs), but these steps alone may not be enough. A new study recommends that exercising on the job could be your best defence against upper body MSDs.
Media outlet
Health and Safety Report
Published by: Canadian Centre for Occupational Health and Safety / Hamilton, ON
Date published
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Adequate rest and recovery critical to help workers avoid burnout

Experts say significant stretches of overtime without adequate time for recovery result in diminished work performance and pose potentially serious health risks. The Institute for Work & Health (IWH)'s Dr. Cameron Mustard comments on risks of mistakes and fatigue
Media outlet
The Ottawa Citizen
Published by: Postmedia Network / Ottawa, ON
Date published
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Benefits, accommodations help arthritis sufferers at work

Providing workplace benefits and accommodations to employees suffering from arthritis can help them maintain concentration and the pace of work, the Institute for Work & Health said in recognition of Arthritis Awareness Month in Canada.
Media outlet
Safety + Health
Published by: U.S. National Safety Council / Itasca, IL
Date published
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Workplace supports help employees with arthritis

Canadians who have difficulty working because of their arthritis report fewer job disruptions when they use workplace supports, says a study by the Institute for Work & Health (IWH).
Media outlet
Benefits Canada
Published by: Rogers Media / Toronto, ON
Date published
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Line blurred between lost-time, no lost-time claims: Study

Lost-time and no-lost time claim categories are not as valuable as they once were in evaluating how well workplaces are performing in primary prevention, according to a study from the Institute for Work & Health (IWH) in Toronto.
Media outlet
Canadian Occupational Safety
Published by: Thomson Reuters Canada / Toronto, ON
Date published
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Unionized firms are safer, concludes OCS-funded study

A new study analyzing injury claims data for 5,800 unionized firms and 39,000 non-unionized firms suggests unionized construction firms in Ontario are safer than non-union firms.
Media outlet
Daily Commmercial News
Published by: Construction Market Data / Toronto, ON
Date published
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Unions keep construction workers safer, study shows

A new landmark study of Ontario construction firms shows unionized shops report far fewer serious injuries than non-unionized companies.
Media outlet
The Toronto Star
Date published
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Work disability: Spiralling down

New research by the Institute for Work & Health (IWH) suggests that seriously injured workers tend to have shorter lifespans and that those who are permanently impaired following workplace incidents in their younger years have the highest risk of dying early.
Media outlet
OHS Canada
Published by: Annex Newcom / Toronto, ON
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Ontario employers cashing in on temporary workers

The second in a four-part series looks at the precarity of temp agency work. The Institute for Work & Health's Dr. Ellen MacEachen is interviewed about her research on injury risks among temp agency workers.
Media outlet
The Toronto Star
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Study: Time-loss injuries may depend on work demands, premium rates

The line between no-time-loss injuries and time-loss injuries becoming blurrier, according to an Institute for Work & Health (IWH) study by Dr. Peter Smith.
Media outlet
Canadian Occupational Health & Safety News
Published by: Business Information Group / Toronto, ON
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Get seriously injured on job. Die sooner?

Getting seriously injured on the job is bad enough. But according to a study from the Institute for Work & Health (IWH), people who are permanently impaired by work—related injury also face a greater risk of dying early—a risk that remains more than a decade after the injury.
Media outlet
OHS Insider
Published by: Bongarde Media / Penticton, BC
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New tools to help businesses improve occupational health and safety performance

An OHS research project aims to make leading indicator information a key part of decision-making through the development of two new technological tools: an app and a dashboard.
Media outlet
Every Worker
Published by: Workplace Safety North / North Bay, ON
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Ergonomics programs drive down injury rates

Ontario utilities still have ergonomics programs in place years after participating in a research study, according to an article co-authored by Kitchener-Wilmot Hydro's George Minow, one of the study participants.
Media outlet
Transmission & Distribution World
Published by: Penton Publications / New York, NY
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Online program emphasizes office ergonomics

As part of International Repetitive Strain Injury Awareness Day, office workers can use a new online training program to learn about the importance of ergonomics and how to reduce the risk of musculoskeletal disorders.
Media outlet
Safety + Health
Published by: National Safety Council / Itasca, IL
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OT workers finally get a break

New program at CAMI automotive assembly plant hopes to set a standard for workplace flexibility in the auto industry. An Institute for Work & Health (IWH) study on the impact of work-life balance and unpaid overtime on health is referenced.
Media outlet
The Toronto Star
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Will shift work age my brain?

There is plenty of evidence that it harms health, but a new report claims that 10 years of shift work ages your brain by an extra 6.5 years. So should you be worried? asks Luisa Dillner in an article that cites Institute for Work & Health.
Media outlet
The Guardian
Date published