Young and new workers

Workers who are in some way “new” to their work have been shown to be at greater risk of work injury. They may be new to the labour market (i.e. young workers), new to their jobs (e.g. because of short-term contract or temporary work, or job change or promotion), or new to the country (i.e. recent immigrants). IWH research tracks injury rates trends among this group, explores the factors behind the increased risk, and evaluates programs designed to protect these potentially vulnerable workers.

Featured

Young workers at service counter
At Work article

What research can do: IWH research helps prevention system shift focus from young to new workers

Thanks to IWH research, Ontario’s prevention partners no longer refer to the issue of “young worker safety” but to the larger issue of “young and new worker safety” or, simply, “new worker safety.”
Published: July 31, 2019
Sticky note clipped to a notebook reads "welcome aboard"
At Work article

Review confirms prevention system’s message about injury risks and new workers

IWH systematic review finds evidence for higher risks of acute injuries, but inconclusive evidence for MSD risks, during workers’ first year
Published: July 30, 2019
Young workers at service counter
At Work article

What research can do: IWH research helps prevention system shift focus from young to new workers

You know research has had an impact when it changes the language used to frame an issue, and the findings become so ubiquitous they are considered part of the “common wisdom.” That seems to be the case with IWH’s research on injury risks and new workers.
Published: July 2019
Sticky note clipped to a notebook reads "welcome aboard"
At Work article

Review confirms prevention system’s message about injury risks and new workers

If you've been spreading the message about new workers facing higher risks of injury, rest assured. A first ever systematic review on job tenure and injury risks, conducted by IWH, confirms that message.
Published: July 2019
Journal article
Journal article

Are new workers at elevated risk for work injury? A systematic review

Published: Occupational & Environmental Medicine, May 2019
Canadian Occupational Safety logo
IWH in the media

Tailored support effective for young workers with disabilities

Young adults today have difficulty entering the labour market, especially those with chronic disabling conditions. A systematic review of the relevant research found tailored supported employment interventions can help young individuals with chronic disabilities succeed on the job, Amanda Silliker reports.
Published: Canadian Occupational Safety, February 2019
A young woman sits in front of the desk of an older man in a suit and tie, both smiling
At Work article

Supported job placements help young adults with disabilities find work: review

Job placements, offered in tandem with a suite of tailored employment supports, can help young people with disabilities make the transition into the labour force, according to an IWH systematic review.
Published: February 2019
IWH Speaker Series
IWH Speaker Series

Promoting labour market transitions for young adults with chronic disabling conditions: a systematic review

Young adulthood is an important phase of life when most people establish their careers. And yet, it's a time when many young adults with disabling health conditions find themselves excluded from the labour market. A systematic review led by Dr. Arif Jetha examined work-focused interventions to support the transition of these young adults into the labour market. In this presentation, he shares findings and highlights the effectiveness of these interventions across different career stages and disability types.
Published: November 2018
The Conversation logo
IWH in the media

For millennials, employment is a public health challenge

Millennials now make up the largest share of the Canadian workforce and many are facing precarious work conditions. The long-term public health implications of these trends will be significant, and should be addressed at the policy level, writes Dr. Arif Jetha.
Published: The Conversation, September 2018
The Toronto Star logo
IWH in the media

Precarious work a health threat for millennials

Findings from a recent report by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA) suggest that working in a professional job no longer provides Canadians with access to working conditions that are optimal for health. These findings highlight a troubling trend: a great number of Canadians could be facing working conditions that are linked with poorer health, writes Dr. Arif Jetha.
Published: Toronto Star, August 2018