Working conditions and health

What are the effects of work, workplace and labour force conditions on the health and safety of workers and other members of society? Institute for Work & Health (IWH) research in this area seeks to understand the context in which government, sector-based and workplace injury and disability prevention programs operate. This research explores known and emerging injuries, diseases and disorders that are related to job, workplace and/or labour market conditions. It looks at the scope, potential causes and risk factors for these injuries and illnesses, as well as their effect on workers, workplaces, regulators and society as a whole.

Latest news and findings

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Psychosocial work conditions linked with both positive and negative mental health outcomes, study finds

Better psychosocial work conditions—greater job control, social support and job security—are linked with workers having reduced risks of mental disorders such as depression and anxiety. But a new study by IWH suggests they’re also linked with a greater likelihood of workers having flourishing mental health. Indeed, psychosocial work factors have a stronger link to positive mental well-being than to the likelihood of poor mental health.

Get the study highlights
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World Congress 2020, a global forum on emerging OHS issues, coming to Toronto

Occupational health and safety (OHS) professionals, get ready to take a break from the day-to-day issues and take in the big picture. In a little over a year, the most forward-thinking OHS policy-makers and practitioners from around the globe will gather in Toronto for the XXII World Congress on Safety and Health at Work. With the theme "Prevention in the Connected Age," the October 4-7, 2020, event will be your chance to hear and share ideas about the OHS challenges and innovations coming over the horizon.  

Find out more
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Rates of workplace violence against women rising in Ontario’s education sector

Women working in Ontario’s education sector are four to six times more likely than their male counterparts to require time off work due to physical assaults on the job.This is according to a recent study from the Institute for Work & Health that looked at workplace violence rates among men and women across various sectors.

Read about the study in At Work
Dr. Arif Jetha

IWH associate scientist a recipient of Ottawa's New Frontiers in Research Fund

Congratulations to IWH Associate Scientist Dr. Arif Jetha, who has been awarded a grant from the Government of Canada's New Frontiers in Research Fund. The grant, announced this week, will support Jetha in a new research project examining the future of work and how the changing labour market may impact young people with disabilities.

Find out more about the project
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IWH Speaker Series: Link between use of substances affecting central nervous system and workplace injuries, deaths

Prescription and recreational drugs that act on the central nervous system—for example, opioids, benzodiazepines and cannabis, among others—can have many adverse effects, including cognitive and psychomotor impairments. An IWH systematic review examined the links between the use of such substances and workplace injury and fatality risks. On May 28, IWH Associate Scientist Dr. Nancy Carnide shares findings from that systematic review at an IWH Speaker Series presentation.

Sign up to attend