Workplace OHS programs and practices

Workplaces play a vital role in ensuring the well-being of workers. So knowing what occupational health and safety (OHS) practices are most effective in preventing injury and illness is essential. The Institute for Work & Health (IWH) has a long history of conducting workplace-based research to provide practical guidance to employers, workers, OHS professionals and regulators about what works and what doesn’t. This research targets the injury and illness prevention practices of workplaces, as well as the programs developed by governments, health and safety associations and others to support and motivate workplaces in adopting effective practices.

Latest news and findings

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Watch again: A systematic review of workplace interventions to manage depression

The research literature to date suggests that cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) can help people with depression stay at work—and CBT with a focus on work can help people return to work after a depression-related absence. These findings from a systematic review, on workplace interventions to manage depression, were the focus of an IWH Speaker Series presentation in January 2018. If you missed that presentation or want to watch it again, it's available as a slidecast. 

Watch the slidecast
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Now recruiting Manitoba construction firms for an OHS leading indicators study

How does your construction company measure up on safety? IWH and the Construction Safety Association of Manitoba are teaming up on a project to develop health and safety leading indicators for the construction sector. They’re also building benchmarks for the province’s construction workplaces. The project is now recruiting construction firms operating in Manitoba of all types and sizes to complete an online survey. Watch and share the recruitment video to help us spread the word. Or go to our project page for recruiting info.

Watch and share the video
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Boost OHS training outcomes with embedded essential skills content

Are you concerned that literacy or numeracy skills gaps among workers would get in the way of their uptake of job skills or OHS training? If so, embedding essential skills content in the job or OHS training could help. Our recent study of hoisting and rigging learners showed better scores among those who took the training with embedded essential skills. A guide based on that research is now available to download.

Read about the study
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Guide to support workers with depression now available to download

If someone you work with or supervise experiences depressionor if you have symptoms yourselfthere are ways to offer and seek support. Our new Evidence-informed guide to supporting people with depression in the workplace lays out tips and suggestions. It’s aimed at helping people with depression cope with symptoms while working or returning to work after an episode of depression. Users may include individuals with depression, managers, co-workers, human resources staff, union representatives and worker representatives. When it comes to supporting workers with depression, everyone can help.

Download the guide
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WSPS small business strategy taps into IWH's model of breakthrough change

In 2016, IWH Scientist Dr. Lynda Robson created a model of “breakthrough change” based on her research into the critical factors behind large and sustained occupational health and safety improvements in organizations. In a new impact case study, Workplace Safety and Prevention Services (WSPS) Small Business Director Harry Stewart describes the many ways WSPS's small business strategy builds on that model, which he describes as the "foundation for how we’re moving forward." 

Read the case study