Mental health in the workplace

Workplaces play a dual role in the area of mental health. On the one hand, they can be a stressful environment that contributes to mental health problems among workers. On the other hand, they can play an important part in helping to detect and manage mental health problems when they arise among workers, and in ensuring the healthy recovery and return of workers who are off work due to a mental health issue. IWH research in this area helps paint a clearer picture of the prevalence of mental health problems among workers, the types of labour force and workplace factors that may contribute to poor mental health, and the workplace-based and system prevention efforts that can help improve the mental health of workers and ensure they have the proper supports when needed.

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A young woman looks at her phone in frustration and exasperation
At Work article

Poor interactions with case managers linked with risk of mental illness later on

A new Ontario study finds face higher risks of serious psychological distress among injured workers who report not being treated with respect or not given the information they need in their interactions with case managers.
Published: March 9, 2022
Long shadows cast by a row of workers
At Work article

Study probes factors behind poorer health, lower employment in injured workers’ post-claim experience

What are the work and health outcomes of injured workers after they no longer receive workers' compensation benefits or services? A study at IWH sets out to explore this little understood aspect of the post-injury experience.
Published: November 23, 2021
A young woman looks at her phone in frustration and exasperation
At Work article

Poor interactions with case managers linked with risk of mental illness later on

A new Ontario study finds face higher risks of serious psychological distress among injured workers who report not being treated with respect or not given the information they need in their interactions with case managers.
Published: March 2022
Journal article
Journal article

Longitudinal reciprocal relationships between the psychosocial work environment and burnout

Published: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, March 2022
Long shadows cast by a row of workers
At Work article

Study probes factors behind poorer health, lower employment in injured workers’ post-claim experience

What are the work and health outcomes of injured workers after they no longer receive workers' compensation benefits or services? A study at IWH sets out to explore this little understood aspect of the post-injury experience.
Published: November 2021
IWH Speaker Series
IWH Speaker Series

Uncovering the impact of a depressive episode on employment earnings of Canadian workers

Despite much attention being paid to the employment outcomes of Canadians experiencing depression, we still know little about the long-term impact of depression on their work earnings. In this presentation, IWH Associate Scientist Kathleen Dobson shares findings from her novel study using data linkages to uncover the impact of a depressive episode on employment earnings over a decade.
Published: November 2021
Infographic
Infographic

Return to work: Differences between work-related psychological and physical injuries

How different is return to work for people with work-related psychological injuries compared to those with work-related musculoskeletal conditions? To answer this question, researchers at the Institute for Work & Health and Monash University followed 869 injured workers in Victoria, Australia for 12 months. This infographic highlights key findings from the study.
Published: November 2021
A worker slumps over in fatigue and defeat, next to an angry boss and a desk piled high with work
At Work article

For a segment of the workforce, psychosocial working conditions are poor across the board

For one in 10 Canadian workers, the psychosocial work environment is poor across the board. What's more, working in such conditions is associated with a substantial increase in their risk of burnout and stress.
Published: October 2021
Canadian Occupational Safety logo
IWH in the media

WorkSafeBC fellowship awardee on the importance of good ergonomics

Dr. Heather Johnston is a recent recipient of the inaugural WorkSafeBC Ralph McGinn Postdoctoral Fellowship award. Her research project is on the risk factors and hazards common between work-related psychological injuries and musculoskeletal injuries, as well as how Canadian workplaces address these common risk factors.

Published: Canadian Occupational Safety, September 2021