Construction sector

IWH research that specifically involves construction workplaces, workers, unions, employers and/or associations, as well as research on programs that specifically target the construction sector, is collected together here. Not included is IWH research that cuts across all or many sectors, even though it may be relevant to the construction sector. For this reason, visitors are encouraged to explore beyond this page to find equally important information on the prevention of work injury and disability in construction.

Featured

A lone roofing worker sits perched on top of a new being built
At Work article

Ontario’s working-at-heights training led to safer practices, reduced injury claims rates

Institute for Work & Health’s multi-part evaluation of province’s mandatory training standard found claims reduction greatest among small employers and high-risk construction subsectors
Published: April 11, 2019
A worker guides a crane lifting concrete at a construction site
At Work article

Embedding essential skills training in OHS lessons can boost learning: study

A pilot project by the Institute for Work & Health finds improved learning when hoisting and rigging students receive essential skills content as part of OHS training
Published: April 26, 2018
Toronto Sun logo
IWH in the media

Guest column: T.O. council's decision on construction tendering makes sense

On June 19th , Toronto City Council voted overwhelmingly to maintain its contractual relationship with the province’s major construction union. It's a longstanding relationship that militates towards high quality work, safer job sites and a robust training sector, writes guest columnist Phil Gillies, who points to IWH research on the union safety effect to support one of his arguments.
Published: Toronto Sun, July 2019
A lone roofing worker sits perched on top of a new being built
At Work article

Ontario’s working-at-heights training led to safer practices, reduced injury claims rates

Ontario's mandatory training standard for construction workers at risk of falls from heights was effective in reducing claims rates—especially among small employers and high-risk subsectors—an IWH evaluation study found.
Published: April 2019
Workers Health & Safety Centre logo
IWH in the media

Regulated working at heights training works and needed: studies

Two recently released Ontario studies demonstrate why mandatory, standardized working at heights training is so critical to worker well-being. One study undertaken by the Institute for Work & Health (IWH) conducted an evaluation of the impact the province’s working at heights training standard had on workers and their work sites. A second and earlier probe prepared by the Ministry of Labour (MOL) for the Chief Prevention Officer undertook root cause analysis of worker deaths from falls from heights.
Published: Workers Health & Safety Centre, April 2019
Daily Commercial News logo
IWH in the media

WAH training standards show 'significant' results: IWH

Findings of a study evaluating the effectiveness of Ontario’s working at heights (WAH) training standards, conducted by a team of researchers at the Institute for Work and Health (IWH), were revealed recently during the Ontario General Contractors Association’s Leadership Day and COR Open House in Mississauga, Ont., Angela Gismondi reports.
Published: Daily Commercial News, March 2019
Toronto Sun logo
IWH in the media

Opinion: Avoid shoddy work by using unionized tradespeople for public construction projects

Why do many municipalities, school boards, social housing corporations and other public bodies have long-standing arrangements that see their construction projects built by skilled tradespeople who are members of construction unions? Because the employees are well trained, they work safer and, in the long run, are not a significantly greater cost to the taxpayer than their non-unionized counterparts, writes Phil Gillies in an op-ed that cites Institute for Work & Health research.
Published: Toronto Sun, March 2019
Project report
Project report

Evaluation of the implementation and effectiveness of the Ontario working-at-heights training standard: executive summary

This summary shares the highlights from an Institute for Work & Health evaluation of the implementation and effectiveness of a mandatory working-at-heights training program introduced in Ontario in 2015. Ontario employers were required to ensure that workers on construction projects who worked at heights had successfully completed the training by October 2017.
Published: February 2019
Project report
Project report

Evaluation of the implementation and effectiveness of the Ontario working-at-heights training standard: final report

The Institute for Work & Health shares the findings from its evaluation of the implementation and effectiveness of a mandatory working-at-heights training program introduced in Ontario in 2015. Ontario employers were required to ensure that workers on construction projects who worked at heights had successfully completed the training by October 2017.
Published: February 2019
Project
Project

Occupational health and safety performance in Ontario's unionized construction sector

A previous Institute study found that, during the period 2006-2012, unionized contractors in Ontario's industrial, commercial and institutional sector had higher no-lost-time claim rates and lower lost-time claim rates than their non-unionized counterparts, suggesting unionized contractors may do better at encouraging injury reporting and reducing injury risk. A new IWH study is replicating the methods of this previous study for the time period 2012-2017.
Status: Ongoing
A worker guides a crane lifting concrete at a construction site
At Work article

Embedding essential skills training in OHS lessons can boost learning: study

The work of rigging and hoisting loads comes with significant hazard. Adding to the injury prevention challenge is the fact that many people doing this work have literacy and numeracy skills gaps. A recent IWH study tried out a novel approach to address these learning needs.
Published: April 2018
Graphic of cranes hoisting letters in word learning
Tools and guides

Essential Skills and OHS Training

This guide, based on a research collaboration led by the Institute for Work & Health, provides an overview of the process involved in modifying the curriculum of an existing occupational health and safety (OHS) training program in order to address gaps in essential skills among worker trainees.
Published: April 2018